Posts Tagged ‘Hong Kong On Air’

Money from Asia fuels Las Vegas rebound

October 30, 2014

From betting on baccarat to backing resort projects, Asian money is leading the revival in Las Vegas. Top gaming consultant Steve Gallaway, a partner at Global Market Advisors, and author of Chopsticks and Gambling Desmond Lam give their views on Asia’s influence on Las Vegas.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

Singapore regulators push non-gaming revenue

October 26, 2014

With their casino revenue potential restrictions, Singapore’s integrated resorts booked $1.3 billion in revenue beyond the casino floor last year from hotels, shopping, conventions and attractions, much of it at higher margins than gaming. That’s a quarter of Singapore IRs’ total revenue, five times better than Macau’s percentage of non-gaming revenue, but less than half of the ratio for Las Vegas.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

New Indonesia president faces legislative deadlock

October 20, 2014

Monday’s inauguration of Joko Widowo as Indonesia’s seventh president is a transformational moment for the world’s third largest democracy. Known as Jokowi, Widodo is Indonesia’s first retail politician and will be the first freely elected leader who wasn’t part of the power structure during Suharto’s 40 years of authoritarian rule. At Indonesia’s Ubud Writers Festival., experts warned the remnants of those bad old days threat to stop Jokowi’s reformist agenda, bad news for Southeast Asia’s largest economy and the nation with the world’s largest Muslim population.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

Hong Kong, Beijing need electoral reform all can accept

October 17, 2014

Whether or not protestors remain on the streets, Hong Kong and Beijing need a mutually acceptable election solution to keep my adopted hometown a vibrant world city that serves the interests of its residents and mainland China. The rest of world, where local and national governments often have divergent political outlooks but work together for the common good, shows it’s possible. Moreover, that’s the essence of “one country, two systems.” Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying’s performance, telling protestors there’s “zero chance” for changing Beijing’s proposal that will thwart real representative government, graphically demonstrates how crucial it is for Hong Kong be able to choose a leader that stands up for its interests, not only Beijing’s. Good faith and smart people on all sides must make it happen before Hong Kong’s government makes more mistakes.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

Philippines gears up for casino big leagues

October 15, 2014

The Philippines hopes to get on the regional gaming map with two $1 billion-plus integrated resorts opening in Manila in the coming months. These properties will need to bring in planeloads of foreign players to meet expectations.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

Rough September, worse October for Macau

October 10, 2014

Macau casino revenue took its worst tumble in five years in September. The outlook for October, traditionally one of the most lucrative months on the calendar due to China’s Golden Week holiday, is an even bigger fall.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

South Korea casinos bank on Chinese tourists

October 1, 2014

Standard Chartered bank says South Korean casinos are poised to outgrow Macau thanks to Chinese tourists, liberal benefits to players and integrated resorts on the drawing board.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

Venetian Macao places Sheldon Adelson atop Asian Gaming 50 again this year

September 29, 2014

Venetian Macao is overwhelming, not necessarily in a good way. Check in and they expect you to drag your own bags to your room, most easily reached through the casino. Due to the resort’s huge size – it’s bigger than the Pentagon – getting anywhere is a pain, frequently starting with the walk from the elevator to your room. Rooms are generously sized and furnished, but there’s a step between the sleeping and sitting area that’s a broken toe or ankle waiting to happen. Despite those issues and many others, Venetian Macao is the main reason that Sheldon Adelson tops the Asian Gaming 50 from Inside Asian Gaming magazine again this year.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

Activist/author Pisani sees a place for corruption

September 17, 2014

At TEDx Ubud earlier this month, author and activist Elizabeth Pisani highlighted how corruption fits into social and political contexts, a vexing issue for US companies doing business overseas. Pisani, who will also appear next month’s Ubud Writers and Readers Festival, also noted that corruption isn’t always about self-enrichment.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.

Hong Kong needs democracy; ‘Occupy the Process’ to get it

September 13, 2014

Like most other Hong Kongers, I’m appalled by Beijing’s phony version of universal suffrage to choose the city’s chief executive. Beijing’s attempt to seize the nominating process undermines the principle of one country-two systems and Hong Kong’s promised high degree of autonomy.

The current system has produced ineffective chief executives who do not represent Hong Kong. Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying (or CY Leung), like his predecessors, owes his position to Beijing and its Hong Kong loyalists, many of them business tycoons that benefit hugely from government largesse in Hong Kong and the mainland. (Macau’s chief executive is selected by an almost identical method, featuring an even smaller circle of voters.) As a result, Leung is far more intent on protecting their prerogatives than defending Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy that was promised when China regained sovereignty in 1997, a time I chronicle in my novel of Hong Kong On Air.

I’ve commented on two fine perspectives on the situation Beijing has created in Hong Kong on Forbes.com, one by Gordon Chang and one by Kandy Wong. I urge you to read both articles to understand why freedom loving people around the world should stand up and say, paraphrasing John F Kennedy in Berlin: “Ngo haih Heung Gong yahn.”

I’ve reposted my comments, with some annotations below:

[On Gordon Chang’s piece]
“As a Hong Konger, the issue is simple: Hong Kong people, not Beijing, should choose who rules Hong Kong.

I used to believe the great barrier to democracy was Hong Kong’s business community. But now Beijing has asserted its power over Hong Kong and trashed the principle of one country-two systems. Hong Kong deserves better, and I hope we can convince Beijing to do what’s right.”

[On Kandy Wong’s piece]
“As someone else who has chosen to call Hong Kong home, I agree that we deserve the right to choose our leadership without the heavy hand of Beijing. While Beijing talks about loyalty to the one country, that is really a fig leaf for its fear of real representative government on Chinese soil. The goal of universal suffrage in Hong Kong cannot be to overthrow the government of China, but to bring truly representative and effective government to Hong Kong. What happens in the mainland should be decided by the people of the mainland, and what happens in Hong Kong should be decided by the people of Hong Kong.

I’m not enthusiastic about Occupy Central [the plan for civil disobedience to disrupt Hong Kong’s business center to press for democracy]; instead I believe energies should be directed to Occupy the Process. The electoral system, as Beijing wants it, will be rigged, but Hong Kong people should do all we can, beginning today, to try to make it present a real choice. Identify the members of the nominating committee and build public pressure on them to nominate candidates that are endorsed by Hong Kong people. Boycott their businesses and challenge them publicly if they won’t comply. But first, I hope LegCo [the Legislative Council] will reject the current offer and make Beijing come back to the negotiating table. Shame on Britain and Margaret Thatcher for leaving this question up in the air and putting Hong Kong in this position.”

Author Nury Vittachi offers a different view on Britain and democracy to Hong Kong. However, as Kandy Wong said in reply to my comment, it’s not important what the Brits, did or didn’t do, the issue is what can Hong Kong do now that Beijing has put the mock in democracy. Vittachi, in his piece, makes the point, “Hong Kong has a long history of pro-democracy people succeeding in getting concessions where pro-Beijing people have said it was impossible.” To channel JFK again, so let us begin anew.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is a blogger for Forbes and author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, high finance, and cheap lingerie. See his bio, online archive and more at www.muhammadcohen.com; follow him on Facebook and Twitter @MuhammadCohen.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 193 other followers

%d bloggers like this: