Ask not about the state of US politics

Tuesday’s midterm elections show how low US politics has sunk. Not because Republicans won, but how they won.

During the worst economic crisis since the 1930s Republicans disavowed any responsibility for the debacle rooted in Republican dogma and adopted, as a matter of party policy, opposition to every effort mitigate its impacts and address its causes. (Imagine if Democrats had reacted similarly to the outrageously undemocratic Supreme Court decision that handed George W Bush the 2000 presidential election or 9/11.) Then Republicans beat Democrats over the head with their failure to solve the crisis and, fueled by unlimited corporate and plutocrat spending, proposed as a solution the same save-the-rich policies dressed in populist clothes that sent the economy over the cliff; maybe this time Wall Street will stop when it’s just half-way down the abyss.

American politics wasn’t always like this. Fifty years ago, a young president spoke to higher ideals that would be mocked in today’s competition to call opponents the most outrageous names. As I wrote in Asia Times, that president also offered a prescription to revive the American tradition of seeking common ground instead of sowing conflict.

Totally globalized native New Yorker and former broadcast news producer Muhammad Cohen is author of Hong Kong On Air, a novel set in his adopted hometown during the 1997 handover about television news, love, betrayal, financial crisis, and cheap lingerie.

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2 Responses to “Ask not about the state of US politics”

  1. ObamaCare index measures newfound civility « Muhammad Cohen on media and more Says:

    […] week also marks 50 years since John F Kennedy’s inauguration. As I wrote in November, JFK’s inaugural address would be mocked in this age of politics as blood […]

  2. ObamaCare index measures newfound civility « Speak Without Interruption Says:

    […] week also marks 50 years since John F Kennedy’s inauguration. As I wrote in November, JFK’s inaugural address would be mocked in this age of politics as blood […]

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